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Tagged: epa ethanol

January 17, 2013

Responding to a federal appeals court decision on higher levels of ethanol fuel (E15), Kris Kiser, president and CEO of the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI) — an international trade association representing more than 84 small-engine, utility vehicle and OPE manufacturers and suppliers worldwide — issued the following statement on Jan. 16: Read more from this article here.

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January 16, 2013

We just received word that the federal appeals court refused to reconsider a decision to throw out a lawsuit challenging an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rule that allows higher concentrations of corn-based ethanol in gasoline.

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January 10, 2013

A slow rumble across the convention-hall floor during this week’s annual Green Industry and Equipment Expo (GIE+EXPO) wasn’t coming from the outdoor gear being demonstrated behind the Kentucky Expo Center, at the show’s 19-acre outdoor area. Rather, it was from news that some gas stations in Iowa, Kansas and Wisconsin had begun selling gasoline with 15 percent ethanol, or E15. We talked to Kris Kiser, President and CEO of the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute, but the subject came up in conversations with every manufacturer we met.  Read more from this article here.    

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October 17, 2012

Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI) President Kris Kiser talks about the business of equipment and how government regulations may affect their future. OPEI is an international trade association representing 84 manufacturers and their suppliers of consumer and commercial outdoor power equipment, such as lawnmowers, utility vehicles, trimmers, chainsaws, snow throwers, and other related products. The institute was founded in 1952, and is dedicated to promoting the outdoor power equipment industry by undertaking activities that can be pursued more effectively by an association than by individual companies. OPEI is also a managing partner of GIE+EXPO, the industry’s annual international trade show [.....]

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October 16, 2012

The Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI) announced featured speakers from the EPA and CPSC who will be speaking on Friday, Oct. 26, 2012, at the upcoming 2012 GIE+EXPO held at the Kentucky Exposition Center. Glenn Passavant and Philip Carlson from the EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality will be featured speakers at a 10 a.m. Workshop, to be held in Room C-202. They will be speaking on topics of immediate interest and importance to the OPE industry. There will be time allowed for an open Q&A at the end of the presentation.  Read more from this article here.

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October 10, 2012

The Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI) announced Oct. 9 the featured speakers for presentations by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) at the Green Industry & Equipment Expo (GIE+EXPO), which is set to take place Wednesday, Oct. 24, through Friday, Oct. 26, at Louisville’s Kentucky Exposition Center. Both presentations will be free for GIE+EXPO attendees (with no registration required), and both will be held Friday. Glenn Passavant and Philip Carlson from the EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality will be the featured speakers at a 10 a.m. workshop to be held in Room [.....]

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June 19, 2012

The fight over E15 is not over yet. The Environmental Protection Agency has given the approval for retailers to sell 15% ethanol blended fuel. The fuel we purchase at most gas stations around the country today already has 10% ethanol mixed in. The EPA and other supporters of the plan have wanted to add an additional 5% ethanol to the fuel mix for cars built after 2001. “Today, the last significant federal hurdle has been cleared to allow consumers to buy fuel containing up to 15 percent ethanol (E15),” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “This gets us one step closer [.....]

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June 18, 2012

Alexandria, Va. – June 18, 2012 — The Outdoor Power Equipment Institute issues a warning today that the EPA’s ruling providing their approval of the sale of 15 percent ethanol (E15) into the U.S. consumer marketplace for automobiles made since 2001, is dangerous. The government’s test results that show E15 is harmful to outdoor power equipment, boats and marine engines and other non-road engine products. The fuel used for automobiles and other engine products would have to be divided, substantially increasing the risk for misfueling, significant engine damage and consumer hazard. “For the first time in American history, fuel used [.....]

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April 24, 2012

The door has been opened for E15, fuel containing 15% ethanol, to make its way to the marketplace as early as this summer. Lawn equipment operators and their servicing dealers must remain diligent and work together in order to avoid potential equipment problems as a result. According to the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI), small engine-powered equipment is not designed to run on anything greater than E10. Improperly filling your lawn equipment with E15 could result in irreversible engine damage, in addition to exposing operators to a variety of safety risks. The EPA has approved the first round of applications [.....]

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April 17, 2012

Industry groups concerned about the effect of 15 percent ethanol (E15) on engines continue to urge the government to conduct further study, saying the  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) weak labeling effort is inadequate to protect consumers and avoid potential misfueling and damage to millions of legacy products not designed to run on any ethanol fuel higher than E10. In September 2011, members of the Engine Products Group (Outdoor Power Equipment Institute, National Marine Manufacturers Association, Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers and Global Automakers) filed a formal legal challenge to EPA’s “Regulation to Mitigate Misfueling” rule which was meant to address [.....]

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