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Tagged: e15

June 10, 2014

OPEI’s campaign continues to warn users of boats, motorcycles, snowmobiles, small engine and outdoor power equipment to use correct fuel   Alexandria, Va., June 10, 2014—Protecting your boat, outdoor power equipment, snow mobile, motorcycle and small engine equipment just got easier – thanks to a new partnership that reminds consumers to avoid using greater than 10 percent ethanol gas in any outdoor power equipment or other non-road product, such as boats, snowmobiles and motorcycles, with the exception of “flex-fuel” engine products. The National Marine Manufacturers Association, the leading association for the North American recreational boating industry, will distribute ‘Look Before [.....]

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March 24, 2014

The gasoline most of us put into our cars and outdoor gear, with 10-percent ethanol, is available nationwide, and we pump E10 without a second thought. But a newer form of gas is good for only some cars—and a nightmare for outdoor power equipment. Nothing, in fact, warns you against filling up your mower, string trimmer, or gas can other than a little 3×3-inch warning label that competes for your attention with larger, bolder ads on the gas pump. So the outdoor power equipment trade group is waving the warning flag in Lowe’s, Walmart, and other stores. That newer form [.....]

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December 9, 2013

Soon enough, you won’t just be eyeing that snowblower – you’ll need to fill it up and use it. But there’s a wrinkle users of equipment powered by small gasoline engines need to keep in mind, according to the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute. More gas stations are carrying ethanol blends, and more people are putting the fuels into their cars. But many don’t know those fuels should not be used in the equipment they turn to in winter weather. “Don’t assume that the same ‘gas’ you put in your car can still go in your mower, snowblower, chain saw or [.....]

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November 22, 2013

OPEI’s Kris Kiser explains the organization’s new fuel education campaign. Launched at the 2013 GIE+EXPO, Look Before You Pump is an attempt to educate landscape contractors, dealers and consumers about the threat new, higher-ethanol fuels pose to equipment.To read more from this article, click here.

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October 29, 2013

NEW YORK (CNN) – Options at the gas pump are expanding, and while you’re probably mindful of what goes in your car’s tank, here’s a heads up for those filling up leaf blowers, snow blowers and more. By now, many have put away the lawn mower, moved on to the leaf blower, and may soon tune up the snow blower. No matter which tool you’re powering up, be aware of more options at the gas station, as more ethanol gets pumped into the mix. The key to remember is the fuels marketplace is changing. We are no longer in a [.....]

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October 24, 2013

–Industry’s consumer protection campaign prepares consumers for changing gas pumps and higher ethanol fuel blends– Alexandria, Va., October 23, 2013—The Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI), an international trade association representing 100 small engine, utility vehicle and outdoor power equipment manufacturers and suppliers, today announced a national ethanol education and consumer protection campaign, called ‘Look Before You Pump.’ The ‘Look Before You Pump’ education campaign cautions consumers that it is harmful and illegal to use higher than 10 percent ethanol gas in any outdoor power equipment, such as mowers, chain saws, snow throwers, UTVs, generators and other small engine products.  The [.....]

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September 16, 2013

E15, which is a blend of 15% ethanol and 85% gasoline, is only compatible with cars newer than the 2001 model year, although some automobile manufacturers state that E15 does not comply with the fuel requirements specified in their owner’s manuals. Additionally, E15 is not safe for small-engine powered lawn equipment. Nonetheless, E15 is coming. “As of right now (September 1, 2013) there are more than 30 stations offering E15 in nine states,” says Robert White, director of market development for the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA). Those states are Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Michigan and North [.....]

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September 11, 2013

Below is the executive summary report for the market size study, conducted by Harris Interactive® via its QuickQuerySM online omnibus service from July 31-August 2, 2013.   Survey Methodology This survey was conducted online within the United States between from July 31-August 2, 2013 among 2,040 adults ages 18 and older by Harris Interactive on behalf of OPEI via its Quick Query omnibus product. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.   Background/Objectives Specifically, OPEI sought to learn:   What are the first things people notice [.....]

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September 11, 2013

–OPEI set to launch ethanol education and consumer protection campaign on October 23 at GIE+EXPO 2013 in Louisville, Kentucky – Alexandria, Va., September 11, 2013—A new online survey conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI), the international trade association representing 100 small engine, utility vehicle and outdoor power equipment manufacturers and suppliers, finds that U.S. consumers are ill-prepared for the introduction of higher ethanol fuel blends. EPA has approved the introduction of some mid-level ethanol blends (E15, E30, E85) for use in a small, subset of automobiles in an effort to comply with the [.....]

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May 8, 2013

E15 fuel has been certified for sale in the United States and is slowly beginning to show up at filling stations. Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know about this new fuel option. What is E15 and why should I care? E15 is shorthand for gasoline blended with 15 percent ethanol. The reason it’s a big deal is that ethanol is fairly corrosive to rubber and certain metals, so it can cause damage to vital components. Read more from the article here.

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