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Tagged: blender pumps ethanol

December 9, 2013

Soon enough, you won’t just be eyeing that snowblower – you’ll need to fill it up and use it. But there’s a wrinkle users of equipment powered by small gasoline engines need to keep in mind, according to the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute. More gas stations are carrying ethanol blends, and more people are putting the fuels into their cars. But many don’t know those fuels should not be used in the equipment they turn to in winter weather. “Don’t assume that the same ‘gas’ you put in your car can still go in your mower, snowblower, chain saw or [.....]

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October 29, 2013

NEW YORK (CNN) – Options at the gas pump are expanding, and while you’re probably mindful of what goes in your car’s tank, here’s a heads up for those filling up leaf blowers, snow blowers and more. By now, many have put away the lawn mower, moved on to the leaf blower, and may soon tune up the snow blower. No matter which tool you’re powering up, be aware of more options at the gas station, as more ethanol gets pumped into the mix. The key to remember is the fuels marketplace is changing. We are no longer in a [.....]

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October 24, 2013

–Industry’s consumer protection campaign prepares consumers for changing gas pumps and higher ethanol fuel blends– Alexandria, Va., October 23, 2013—The Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI), an international trade association representing 100 small engine, utility vehicle and outdoor power equipment manufacturers and suppliers, today announced a national ethanol education and consumer protection campaign, called ‘Look Before You Pump.’ The ‘Look Before You Pump’ education campaign cautions consumers that it is harmful and illegal to use higher than 10 percent ethanol gas in any outdoor power equipment, such as mowers, chain saws, snow throwers, UTVs, generators and other small engine products.  The [.....]

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September 16, 2013

E15, which is a blend of 15% ethanol and 85% gasoline, is only compatible with cars newer than the 2001 model year, although some automobile manufacturers state that E15 does not comply with the fuel requirements specified in their owner’s manuals. Additionally, E15 is not safe for small-engine powered lawn equipment. Nonetheless, E15 is coming. “As of right now (September 1, 2013) there are more than 30 stations offering E15 in nine states,” says Robert White, director of market development for the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA). Those states are Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Michigan and North [.....]

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September 11, 2013

Below is the executive summary report for the market size study, conducted by Harris Interactive® via its QuickQuerySM online omnibus service from July 31-August 2, 2013.   Survey Methodology This survey was conducted online within the United States between from July 31-August 2, 2013 among 2,040 adults ages 18 and older by Harris Interactive on behalf of OPEI via its Quick Query omnibus product. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.   Background/Objectives Specifically, OPEI sought to learn:   What are the first things people notice [.....]

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September 11, 2013

– OPEI set to launch ethanol education and consumer protection campaign on October 23 at GIE+EXPO 2013 in Louisville, Kentucky – ALEXANDRIA, VA. — A new online survey conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI), the international trade association representing 100 small engine, utility vehicle and outdoor power equipment manufacturers and suppliers, finds that U.S. consumers are ill-prepared for the introduction of higher ethanol fuel blends. EPA has approved the introduction of some mid-level ethanol blends (E15, E30, E85) for use in a small, subset of automobiles in an effort to comply with the federal [.....]

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February 14, 2013

E15 fuel has been certified for sale in the United States and is slowly beginning to show up at filling stations. Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know about this new fuel option. What is E15 and why should I care? E15 is shorthand for gasoline blended with 15 percent ethanol. The reason it’s a big deal is that ethanol is fairly corrosive to rubber and certain metals, so it can cause damage to vital components. Ethanol also attracts and bonds with water from the air, and that water can separate out inside the tank due to phase separation. If [.....]

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April 27, 2010

Alexandria, VA – September 3, 2008 – AllSAFE members welcome EPA’s recent enforcement letter addressing the need for proper labeling, potential harm from “mid-level” ethanol in gasoline-only vehicles and engines. ALLIANCE FOR A SAFE ALTERNATIVE FUELS ENVIRONMENT

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April 15, 2010

The Outdoor Power Equipment Institute, Inc.) Alexandria, VA – March 6, 2009 – The Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI) today announced that it has serious concerns with a premature rush to 15 percent ethanol (E15) or other mid-level fuel blends as being suggested by pro-ethanol producers. Without a formal waiver process through the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and a continued misinterpretation of test results from a recent Department of Energy (DOE) report, introducing E15 and higher fuels to the marketplace for existing equipment pose serious risks to American consumers and businesses.

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December 1, 2009

Alexandria, VA – December 1, 2009 – The Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI) today announced that it remains concerned by the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) response to the Growth Energy waiver on 15 percent ethanol as it overlooks the impact on hundreds of millions of outdoor power equipment used by consumers, such as utility vehicles, lawnmowers, chainsaws, snow throwers and other affected equipment, including boats, ATVs, motorcycles and snow mobiles. “EPA’s letter basically addressed the consideration of E15 for newer automobiles, but ignores the substantial non-automobile product families and the economic and safety issues related to their use,” said Kris [.....]

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